Proper Oral Hygiene & Brushing After Every Meal

by Yasser Sadek, DDS

This is another excerpt from the book A Reason to Smile – Fixing Broken Confidence with Cosmetic Dentistry.”

It’s important for parents to know how to properly manage their children’s oral hygiene, especially because parents are responsible for taking care of their teeth until the children can physically do so themselves. The fine motor skills needed to properly brush teeth don’t fully develop until the age of 7 or 8, which means that parents are fully responsible for the care of their children’s teeth during those years. Also during those years, parents have to train their children on proper brushing techniques so children can brush their own teeth adequately from the age of 8.

Through talking with parents over the years, I’ve noticed two common themes among children with chronic dental problems: (1) These parents are not consistent about brushing their children’s teeth every day, and (2) These parents let children under age 8 to brush their own teeth. Since children thrive on consistency, when parents aren’t brushing their children’s teeth every day and the oral hygiene regimen is inconsistent, the children are often non-cooperative. And when children younger than 8 years of age are in charge of brushing their own teeth, they just haven’t yet developed the fine motor skills necessary for proper manipulation of the toothbrush, so they don’t do a good job and end up with tooth decay.

Regardless of age, bacteria develop in the mouth to help break down food that humans consume. Within 30 minutes of eating, food particles left in and around our teeth begin to break down and become acidic. This acid is what starts breaking down the enamel of the teeth, causing teeth to decay and eventually causing pain if not treated properly. This is why it is so important to brush your teeth after every meal.

The American Dental Association (ADA) suggests that teeth be brushed at least twice per day. Based on science, we know that when food is consumed and surrounds the teeth the bacteria in the mouth break down the film of food and make it chemically acidic. Acid, if left for 24 hours in the same spot, breaks down and strips the enamel of calcium. Removing the acidic film once every 12 hours eliminates or at least reduces the possibility of that happening.

However, I recommend to my young patient’s parents to brush their children’s teeth three times a day because children are constantly eating or snacking. My own daughter finishes dinner and not 10 minutes later asks for a snack. The fact that children graze all day makes their mouth more acidic than adults, which increases the chances for tooth decay. Children also have another factor working against them, with pediatric teeth being structurally weaker than adult teeth — they are made to be broken down by the adult teeth that are erupting under them. This makes the baby teeth more susceptible to decay, which increases the necessity for more frequent brushing.

Dr. Sadek is Offering Children Dentistry Services

PALMDALE, CA: Dr. Yasser Sadek, (http://palmdalechildrensdental.com/), a University of Southern California trained dentist founded Palmdale Children’s Dental and is offering dental care for small children to Antelope Valley residents.

Dr. Sadek has been practicing dentistry in California since 1995. However it wasn’t until he became concerned about the number of both children and adults with dental phobia that he set about developing an approach to eliminate fear from dentistry. His approach focuses on three features:

1. Assessing the patient’s emotional state and elevating or improving it.
2. Open communication to empower the patient.
3. Modified dental techniques to minimize discomfort.

Dr. Sadek operates a well established pediatric practice in Palmdale, CA where his above approach is successfully empowering young patients and helping them receive more comfortable dental treatment. Dr. Sadek has a way of connecting with children to make them feel at ease. He treats children as smart little people who are capable of making the right decision once they are educated about dental health. Dr. Sadek gains so much trust with young patients that he rarely uses anesthetics and instead only uses nitrous oxide, which increases the safety and comfort of their treatment.

Monique, a past patient of Dr. Sadek stated: “Very pleased with the attention and handling of my son as a patient and myself as a parent! On both of our visits, I’ve received good customer service from the front desk. My three-year-old son has received quality care from the back office/dental assistants as well. I enjoy all the little ways they make this a great place for children! From the play area in the waiting room, to the animal faced instruments, to the personal dental chair movie options! It’s great! The doctor/dentist is a sweet man! My son even reached for him and hugged him as we said goodbye.”

Dr. Sadek is also the co-author of a new book on dentistry entitled “A Reason to Smile: Fixing Broken Confidence With Cosmetic Dentistry.” The book can be found on Amazon at: https://www.amazon.com/Reason-Smile-Confidence-Cosmetic-Dentistry-ebook/dp/B071GTC4Y5/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499815921&sr=8-1&keywords=A+Reason+to+Smile.

Dr. Sadek is a member of the American Dental Association, California Dental Association, and American Endodontic Association. He has also served as treasurer, vice president and president of the Yosemite Dental Society. He has always been an active member of the community he serves by donating time and money. He routinely works with the local head start programs, sponsors youth athletic teams and events for the local police department.

Dr. Sadek provides a full range of dental care services for children at Palmdale Children’s Dental in Palmdale, California. Dr. Sadek has over two decades of dental experience, including pediatric, endodontics, orthodontics, implants and cosmetic dentistry. You can visit the dental practice’s website at http://www.palmdalechildrensdental.com and their blog can be seen at http://palmdalechildrensdental.com/blog/. The practice can be reached by phone at 661-266-0300.

Dr. Yasser Sadek Co-Writes Newly Released Dentistry Book

PALMDALE, CA: Dr. Yasser Sadek, (http://palmdalechildrensdental.com/), a University of Southern California trained dentist practicing in Palmdale, CA, has co-written a newly released book on dentistry called “A Reason to Smile: Fixing Broken Confidence With Cosmetic Dentistry.”

“A Reason to Smile” provides a look into the cosmetic dentistry industry and offers insights from some of the leading experts in the field. There are 12 professionals who contributed to the writing of the book and were selected for their dedication and integrity in seeking the best dental solutions for their patients.

Dr. Sadek has been practicing dentistry in California since 1995. From the beginning, he was concerned about the number of children and adults with a fear of the dental chair and set about developing an approach to eliminate fear from dentistry. Dr. Sadek currently operates a pediatric practice in Palmdale, CA where his methods are successfully empowering young patients and helping them receive dental treatment happily. Dr. Sadek connects with children by treating them as smart little people who are capable of making the right decision once they have been educated on dental health. With age-appropriate communication and changing the children’s emotional state from fear to excitement, Dr. Sadek can have even the youngest of patients choosing to have their teeth fixed. Additionally, Dr. Sadek wrote a children’s book on dental health called “A Bug Named Yuk” to help educate children on the importance of dentistry.

“The whole idea is never to force treatment on a child, but to get the child’s permission to fix his teeth,” stated Dr. Sadek.

A customer who read “A Reason to Smile” mentioned, “Great resource to help me understand the rapidly changing field of cosmetic dentistry. Professional descriptions, but very readable and practical for the average consumer.”

Dr. Sadek provides a full range of dental care services for children at Palmdale Children’s Dental in Palmdale, California. Dr. Sadek has over two decades of dental experience, including pediatric, endodontics, orthodontics, implants and cosmetic dentistry. You can visit the dental practice’s website at http://www.palmdalechildrensdental.com, their blog can be seen at http://palmdalechildrensdental.com/blog/, and A Reason to Smile can be purchased at https://www.amazon.com/Reason-Smile-Confidence-Cosmetic-Dentistry-ebook/dp/B071GTC4Y5/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499815921&sr=8-1&keywords=A+Reason+to+Smile.

Setting a Good Foundation for Dental Health

by Yasser Sadek, DDS

This is another excerpt from the book A Reason to Smile – Fixing Broken Confidence with Cosmetic Dentistry.”

The foundation for proper dental health starts when teeth are developing as a fetus is forming in the womb. Because of this process, mothers need to support a healthy lifestyle during their pregnancies. This sets the stage for a child’s teeth to form fully when they begin to come in. Pediatric teeth, or “baby teeth,” start to erupt in the child’s mouth at around six months of age, with the lower incisors typically being the first to come in. At this stage, educating a parent on how to care for their child’s teeth is crucial. I generally like to bring new mothers into my office, with their child, at the first signs of teeth coming in to offer them tips on caring for their child’s teeth.

Many parents ask at what age a child should first visit the dentist for a full examination and cleaning. This is a difficult question to answer because there is a wide range in children’s rate of growth and development, and not every child is in the same stage at exactly the same age. In general a child needs to see a dentist by their second birthday, but problems could arise before that and if not addressed promptly they may cause serious complications by the time a dentist sees the patient and diagnoses them. I usually recommend the parents to bring the child in as soon as the baby teeth erupt.

There are situations when a very early visit to the dentist is unavoidable. One mother came to see me with her two-week-old newborn, who was born with lower incisors already protruding through the gums. The teeth were not yet fully formed and set in the bone, but they were causing the infant pain while nursing and were incredibly painful to the mother when she tried to breastfeed. For this reason, I extracted the child’s incisors when he was only two weeks old. This isn’t a typical case, but I have treated a number of children at a very young age for a variety of reasons. It’s never too early to take your child to the dentist; waiting too long may spur complicated problems. I urge parents to bring their children in as soon as it seems necessary, especially if the child seems to have any pain or if they notice problems within the mouth. Seeing a child and treating their teeth as early as possible helps ensure the overall health of a child.

Pediatric Dentistry

by Yasser Sadek, DDS
(an excerpt from the new book A Reason to Smile – Fixing Broken Confidence with Cosmetic Dentistry.”

Visiting a dentist early and often in childhood can set up a lifetime of healthy results. Genetics dictates physical characteristics from missing teeth to misalignment of the jaw, and cosmetic dentistry plays an important role in making a significant, positive difference as a patient grows. While cosmetic dentistry among adults is on the rise, some procedures can be sidestepped or minimized if parents and dentists partner to adopt an intense focus on early childhood oral hygiene and regular, compassionate and child-centered care.

Every dentist brings a different approach to treating patients, and making the experience pleasant and generally pain-free is the goal. I put a lot of emphasis onto educating the children that come to see me about their dental health. To be effective, I make an extra effort to approach them in a non-threatening manner, which makes them more receptive to the information. When parents bring in their toddlers for their first examination, I examine them in the reception room of my office, looking at their teeth without the big chair and build-up most of us remember from our childhood trips to the dentist. I sit on the floor and play with them. We have a conversation, and I talk about good brushing and how it is important to clean teeth after every meal. I occasionally read and use my book A Bug named Yuk to help create a visual understanding of bacteria in the mouth and the importance of brushing the teeth after meals. During my 20-plus years as a dentist, I have noticed that this approach has benefited my patients over the long-run. Good early oral hygiene prevents worsening problems as children become teenagers and adults.

Dentistry, in general, is the maintenance of healthy teeth, regardless of a patient’s age. When it comes to pediatric dentistry, parents play an important role in their child’s dental health. The most effective pediatric dentistry focuses directly on the child to encourage his or her buy-in to rid disease-causing bacteria. I educate parents while I talk with their children about how to properly care for baby teeth before adult teeth emerge. This includes discussing the role proper nutrition plays in promoting healthy teeth — an important factor to avoid traumatic dentist visits that may have a lasting emotional effect on the child.